Posted in April 2012

Backyard Bees Honey : Humble Beginnings

Backyard Bees Honey : Humble Beginnings

If you haven’t read Part 1, I highly encourage you to read it first. Kelly’s journey began near the winter of 2007, when her husband noticed bees hovering out from a small hole in the backyard fence. It turned out to be a huge hive that was encased between the two wooden fences, and the … Continue reading

Organic Carrots

Organic Carrots

History: A root vegetable that over the years has become domesticated. Originally, it was found in Europe and southwestern Asia as a wild carrot Daucus carota, which is much smaller and has a woodier taste. The carrots I am most acquainted with are the “baby carrots” that can be purchased in your local grocer or the … Continue reading

Backyard Bees Honey : Preface

Backyard Bees Honey : Preface

The first time I heard of Kelly Yrarrazaval was a week ago at Tustin Wholefoods in Orange County . Upon hearing the cliff notes version of the story, I was immediately intrigued and wanted to meet the co-founder of Backyard Bees.  Here is my elevator pitch: “Backyard Bees is a company that saves local hives when … Continue reading

Raw Honey Eats

Raw Honey Eats

History: Thanks to Winnie the Pooh, most of us know that honey is made from bees. But, how do they do it? Bees have a proboscis (think tongue), which is used to collect pollen and nectar. This is then stored in their “honey stomachs.” When filled, the stomach weighs as much as the bee itself … Continue reading

Gai Choy : Jie Cai : 芥菜

Gai Choy : Jie Cai : 芥菜

What you will see is commonly known as “gai choy” in Cantonese OR “jie cai” in Mandarin. It is known as a mustard green, Brassica juncea, which is a species of the mustard plant. History: Several varieties of this plant appears in Chinese, Korean, Japanese, African, and Italian cooking. Africans primarily use the leaves while Asians use … Continue reading

Broccoli Crowns

Broccoli Crowns

History: Broccoli is from the cabbage family, evolving from a wild cabbage in Europe over 2,000 years ago.  The word is actually derived from Italian, broccolo which refers to the flowering top of a cabbage. Typically when you buy broccoli, they come with a long stalk. The more favorite part of the broccoli is the edible flower … Continue reading